Author Vallisneri, A. [Vallisnieri] De corpi marini, che fu' Monti si trovano; delle lore origine; e dello stato del Mondo avanti'l Diluvio, nel Diluvio, e dopo il Diluvio: lettere critiche di Antonio Vallisneri. ... con le annotazioni alle quali s'aggiungono tre altre lettere critiche contre le opere del Sig. Andry, Francese, e suoi Giornali.
Published 1721
Item ID 72596
€1,800.00
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Venezia, Dominico Lovisa, 1721. 4to (21.9 x 16.2 cm). Contemporary limp vellum. Spine with title written in ink in an old hand. Edges speckled red. The rare first edition of this important work on the famous well-preserved fossils of Monte Bolca by the Italian naturalist and medical doctor Antonio Vallisneri, or Vallisnieri (1661-1730). "He is known for being one of the first researchers in medicine to have proposed abandoning the Aristotelian theories for an experimental approach based on the scientific principles suggested by Galileo Galilei. Vallisneri stated that scientific knowledge is best acquired through experience and reasoning. This principle was followed in his anatomical dissections and carefully drawn descriptions of insects. For this reason, his medical career was at the center of heated controversy, as many of his contemporaries could not abandon prevailing medieval theories, even in the face of glaring experimental evidence. He also was keenly interested in the natural sciences, and over his lifetime collected numerous specimens of animals, minerals and other natural objects. Unfortunately his scientific method was limited when it came to interpreting fossil evidence on mountain tops; the only possibility he allowed for was a miraculous Biblical Flood (Flood geology) as the cause for their deposition." (Wikipedia). Neat former owner's inscription, Luigi Moriani, dated 1821, on front free endpaper verso; earlier name on title page erased. Plate IV erroneously numbered XIV, as always. Slight, mostly light, unobtrusive marginal foxing; overall a very nice and clean copy. Nissen ZBI, 4220; Ward and Carozzi, 2215. Palaeontological researches by an early follower of Galilei